Swine Flu Travel Safety – Honeymoon and Vacation Tips to Prevent and Avoid Catching Swine Flu



When it comes to travel safety, a number of factors come into play, from transportation to street smarts and everything in between. But, up until recently, Montezuma’s Revenge held the top spot for travel health concerns when visiting Mexico or other vacation destinations. Now this year we are worrying about Swine Flu travel safety, learning about Swine Flu symptoms and signs of infection, searching for tips on preventing Swine Flu, and ensuring a cure is readily available if we should come in contact with the disease. With so many travel concerns, many travelers are canceling their vacations – even honeymoons – to help protect themselves and avoid catching Swine Flu.

According to doctors, the signs and symptoms of Swine Flu are very similar to the signs and symptoms of flu in general – fever, chills, sweats, rigors, body aches, headaches, watery eyes, runny nose, cough, sore throat, nausea, diarrhea, and even weakness to move. If you experience a number of these signs and symptoms of Swine Flu, you would do yourself a favor to get to your doctor’s office stat.

To further illustrate the Swine Flu pandemic and tips for preventing and avoiding Swine Flu, read on for specific suggestions and explanations from two knowledgeable doctors – Dr. Maurice Ramirez, an ER physician and expert in Pandemic preparation based in Florida, and Dr. Michael Zimring, Director, The Center for Wilderness and Travel Medicine at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, MD.

Q. – Life Love Beauty: What are some safety precautions or other ways travelers can prevent contracting Swine Flu?

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “Everything you need to know about preventing the spread of pandemic flu you learned in kindergarten:

•    Wash your hands.
•    Sneeze (and cough) into your sleeve; it directs the droplets and germs downward.
•    Stay in your seat, respect other’s space (stay out or their sneeze fallout zone), six feet if possible.
•    Don’t share food, drinks, cups, glasses or silverware (don’t double dip the chip in the salsa).
•    Take a nap (get plenty of rest to keep your immune system at optimal functioning).
•    Stay active (exercise actually improves your flu fighting ability).”

A. – Dr. Zimring: “Avoid people who are coughing. If you plan to travel in close quarters like a plane, it won’t hurt to carry n95 face masks with you and use them if you feel in danger from people coughing around you.”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: Is the current spread of Swine Flu a reason to cancel your vacation or honeymoon?

A. – Dr. Zimring: “Depends on where you are going and the status of the situation. If we are in a middle of a pandemic, it might be a good idea to stay close to home in case you need medical care.”

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “Travel should be guided by travel advisories from the World Health Organization (WHO) www.who.int and Centers of Disease Control (CDC) www.CDC.gov Web sites.”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: What are the known symptoms of Swine Flu?

A. – Dr. Ramirez:
“Same as any flu season:”
•    Fever
•    Chills
•    Body Aches
•    Watery Eyes
•    Runny Nose
•    Cough
•    Nausea
•    Diarrhea

A. – Dr. Zimring: “Fever, chills, sweats, and rigors, weakness where you have trouble getting your head off the pillow, sore throat, and then headache….”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: If brides and grooms are considering a honeymoon to Mexico in the near future, should they reconsider due to the current concerns with Swine Flu?

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “Travel should be guided by travel advisories from the World Health Organization (WHO) www.who.int and Centers of Disease Control (CDC) www.CDC.gov websites.”

A. – Dr. Zimring: “At this point, yes.”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: How long do you think it will be till the Swine Flu subsides and it is completely safe to travel to Mexico again? How many months do you think the concerns will linger?

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “A Pandemic can last as long as 12 to 24 months, but since it is present on all populated continents and will soon be present in all countries, the issue of safe travel to Mexico becomes moot.”

A. – Dr. Zimring: “I think we are going to have a lull over the summer and it might come back more widespread this fall and winter.”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: How is Swine Flu spread? What are the ways in which people catch Swine Flu?

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “The flu is spread by ‘droplet contamination,’ which means someone who is infected sneezes or coughs on you; hence the recommendation to stay outside the sneeze fallout zone (six feet).”

A. – Dr. Zimring: “Droplets, coughing droplets in the area around you. The disease is spread by the droplets that you cough up. If you cover your cough with your hand, then touch a door knob, the next person who touches the door knob will now pick up the disease.”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: Does traveling on an airplane to your honeymoon or vacation destination make you more susceptible to catching Swine Flu, since they use the recycled air?

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “The one and only study of recycled air on an aircraft found that travelers were slightly more likely to catch the common cold on an aircraft with recycled air than on an older aircraft with non-recycled air. Unfortunately, there are no non-recycled air aircraft left in the modern commercial fleet.
Of greater concern is that in coach, 8 seats are within the sneeze fallout zone of a middle row seat.”

A. – Dr. Zimring: “The airplane may have some recycled air but a lot of fresh air is brought in. If you are sitting next to someone who has swine flu, your chances are pretty good you will get it. If you are sitting 10 rows back and it is a short flight, probably not. But if it is a long flight, you will have a chance at it.”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: Do we know how long it takes the Swine Flu to show up in your system after first exposure?

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “2 to 4 days, but you are contagious in 2 to 3 days so you can spread disease 1 to 2 days before you show symptoms of disease.”

A. – Dr. Zimring: “1 to 4 days or possibly a little longer, up to a week.”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: What are some fun things couples on their honeymoon can do without worrying about the Swine Flu?

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “An intimate couple already has exposed each other to virtually every disease they each carry, thus the activities they both enjoy are not an issue for flu transmission. Staying in their room or finding a remote hideaway does provide more safety.”

A. – Dr. Zimring: “Isolation, and keeping to yourself – need I say more?”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: Are there any vacation or honeymoon locations that are currently safe from Swine Flu?

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “No, by definition, pandemic means worldwide, virtually at the same time.”

A. – Dr. Zimring: “I would stay away from Mexico, but I would consider any place safe. Remember, thousands of people die from the flu each yea.”

Q. – Life Love Beauty: Anything else you would like to add about Swine Flu symptoms, preve
nting Swine Flu, or treatments for Swine Flu?

A. – Dr. Ramirez: “Remember, everything you need to know about preventing the spread of pandemic flu you learned in kindergarten:

•    Wash your hands.
•    Sneeze (and cough) into your sleeve; it directs the droplets and germs downward.
•    Stay in your seat, respect other’s space (stay out or their sneeze fallout zone), six feet if possible.
•    Don’t share food, drinks, cups, glasses or silverware (don’t double dip the chip in the salsa).
•    Take a nap (get plenty of rest to keep your immune system at optimal functioning).
•    Stay active (exercise actually improves your flu fighting ability).”

A. – Dr. Zimring: “When traveling, get travel insurance; it is essential – see www.travelmedicineMD.com
and then go to the travel insurance button and follow the instructions.”

About the Experts:

Dr. Maurice A. Ramirez is a professional speaker and founder of the consulting firm High Alert, LLC. He assists companies to align business continuity plans with personnel and customer behavior during adversity. Board certified in multiple specialties, Dr. Ramirez serves on expert panels for pandemic preparedness and healthcare surge planning. He is Founding Chairperson of the American Board of Disaster Medicine and a Senior Physician-Federal Medical Officer. Dr. Ramirez has a new book: “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Disaster Preparedness,” which is now available on Amazon (with free Super Saver Shipping). For more information, please visit www.mauricearamirez.com.

Dr. Michael Zimring oversees The Center for Wilderness and Travel Medicine at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, MD, which offers immunizations for travel, pre- and post-travel consultations, treatment for travel-related medical conditions, and even coordination of emergency medical care and evacuations. A graduate of the University of Maryland Medical School, Dr. Zimring joined Mercy Medical Center in 1973. In 2007, Dr. Zimring successfully completed the International Society of Travel Medicine (ISTM)’s Certificate of Knowledge Examination and has been awarded the Certificate in Travel Health. For more information, please visit www.travelmedicineMD.com.

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One thought on “Swine Flu Travel Safety – Honeymoon and Vacation Tips to Prevent and Avoid Catching Swine Flu

  1. During the mid-20th century, identification of influenza subtypes became possible, allowing accurate diagnosis of transmission to humans. Since then, only 50 such transmissions have been confirmed. These strains of swine flu rarely pass from human to human. ‘*::

    Bye <http://healthmedicine.co/

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